Major stations illuminated in blue to honour NHS

London Euston station lit up in blue to honour NHS and key workers.

Three more Network Rail stations have turned blue to show their support for the NHS during the current Coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic.

In what is now become something of a tradition, the stations joined other railway landmarks in bathing themselves in blue light – the colour of the NHS – as part of a weekly tribute to NHS, care staff, health professionals and other key workers.

Captain Matthew Flinders led the first circumnavigation of Australia, which he completed in December 1803. He died in London in 1814, aged 40, and was buried in St James’ cemetery, where Euston station now stands. This statue was erected in 2014, 200 years after his death, when he was thought to be buried somewhere under one of the station’s platforms. However, in 2019, excavations for the new HS2 station uncovered his grave, identified by the lead plaque on his coffin.

London Euston’s station frontage, along with its historic Robert Stephenson and Captain Matthew Flinders statues, were turned blue by the lights.

Workers outside Birmingham New Street ‘clap for the NHS’.

At Birmingham New Street, messages were played on the media eye displays at the three station entrances while station staff applauded the NHS.

Liverpool Lime Street station.

Liverpool Lime Street station also lit up its frontage in honour of the NHS.

Tim Shoveller, Network Rail.

Tim Shoveller, Network Rail managing director for the North West and Central region, said: “It’s been great to join the rest of the railway industry to, quite literally, shine a light on the herculean effort being made by thousands of healthcare professionals working to save lives every day at this time of national crisis.

“We will continue to show how proud we are of the NHS and help in any way we can during the ongoing fight against the spread of Covid-19.”

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